8 Best Glute Workouts: Exercises, Training, Safety, and Variations | The Workout Digest (2024)

Glute exercises are movements that target and strengthen the gluteal muscles, including the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and gluteus minimus. Glute exercises range from bodyweight workouts such as squats and lunges to more complex physical motions such as hip thrusts and glute bridges. Adding glute exercises to your workout routine promotes functional movement patterns and increases overall body strength, tones your hips and butt, and reduces the risk of injury and pain.

8 Best Glute Workouts: Exercises, Training, Safety, and Variations | The Workout Digest (1)

Exercising your glutes is crucial for balanced health and wellness as they offer various benefits. Glute workouts assist in lateral movements, stabilize your spine, and improve your hip extension, which leads to an even distribution of weight throughout your lower back and legs. There are multiple glute exercises, alternatives, and variations that increase strength, mobility, and aesthetic appearance. Below are eight essential glute exercises.

  • Squat: The squat is a compound exercise that engages multiple lower body muscles, including the glutes. Squats involve bending the knees and hips, lowering the body toward the ground, and then returning to a standing position.
  • Dumbbell glute exercises: Dumbbell glute exercises involve incorporating dumbbells into glute-targeting movements like lunges, hip thrusts, or step-ups to increase resistance and challenge the glute muscles.
  • Glute kickback: Glute kickbacks involve extending one leg straight back while in a quadruped position, engaging the glutes, and focusing on lifting the leg until it aligns with the torso or slightly higher.
  • Hip thrust: Hip thrusts primarily target the glutes and involve lying on your back with your knees bent, and your feet flat on the ground, then lifting your hips off the floor by driving through your heels.
  • Lunge: Lunges are unilateral exercises where you step forward or backward, lowering the body until both knees are bent at 90-degree angles. Lunges engage the glutes, quadriceps, and hamstrings.
  • Hip extension exercises: Hip extension exercises involve movements that activate and strengthen the glutes, such as standing leg lifts, cable kickbacks, or donkey kicks.
  • Glute bridge: Glute bridge is a lower body exercise that requires you to lie on your back with your knees bent, and feet flat on the ground. Then, you lift your hips off the ground while squeezing your glutes at the top of the movement and lower your hips back down.
  • Glute ham raise: Glute ham raises involve kneeling on a glute-ham raise machine or using a stability ball to anchor your feet. Start in a kneeling position and lower your upper body towards the floor while engaging your glutes and hamstrings to prevent falling.

It’s fully possible to perform glute workouts at home without any gym equipment. However, using glute exercise accessories increases the intensity and specificity of a workout. The different glute exercise accessories range from resistance bands, barbells and dumbbells, stability balls, and glute machines. For example, a glute ham raise machine allows you to isolate the gluteal muscles and focus solely on improving that region. The additional resistance improves stability and targets the glutes more effectively, which results in an increase in muscle activation, strength gains, and improvements in lower body functions and aesthetics.

Glute exercises are beneficial for both men and women because the workouts improve athletic performance and posture, and sculpt and tone the hips. Men and women both benefit from glute exercises, but there are variations of glute workouts that are better suited for either men or women. For example, one of the best glute workouts for men is the goblet squat, which involves squatting with a dumbbell at your chest. However, one of the best glute workouts for women is the sumo squat, which is a bodyweight exercise.

Training your glutes requires two to three days of glute workouts a week. Exercising your glutes over 3 days a week will cause you to overwork the muscles, which leads to strain and injury. Resting between glute workouts is necessary for proper recovery. Your muscles must recover after strenuous exercise to continue their development.

Below, we discuss the best glute exercises and variations, the benefits of glute workouts, the potential risks of exercising your glutes, and how often you should train your glutes.

1. Squat

A squat is a compound exercise that develops the gluteal muscles, the quadriceps, the hamstrings, and the core muscles. The movement of a squat involves standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and bending at the knees the way you would bend to sit down. The motion of squats extends the hips and leads to stronger glutes, which have three notable benefits. Firstly, squats for the glutes strengthen the lower body and lead to an increase in power and stability. Secondly, squats tone and add definition to your glutes so you have an aesthetically pleasing and balanced physique. Thirdly, squats for the glutes improve posture and help prevent back pain. Squats offer tremendous versatility to any glute workout because they activate so many muscles as a baseline, and have many variations to promote muscle confusion and functional strength.

How to perform squats safely when targeting the glutes

The instructions below demonstrate how to perform squats safely when targeting the glutes.

  1. Stand tall: Stand with your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. Point your toes forward or slightly outwards up to 30°. Lift your chest, flatten your back, and gaze straight ahead to maintain a neutral spine.
  2. Engage your core: Take a deep breath and engage your core muscles before starting the squat. This simple action helps to stabilize your lower back during the exercise.
  3. Begin the squat: Initiate the squat movement from your hips, as though you’re about to sit back into a chair. Your knees should bend naturally as you lower your body.
  4. Lower your body: Continue to lower your body until your thighs are parallel to the ground (or as low as you can go while maintaining good form). Keep your knees in line with your toes and do not extend past them. Maintain your upright chest and neutral spine position, avoiding any arching or rounding.
  5. Squeeze your glutes: Squeeze your glutes as you lower down and maintain that engagement as you push back up. This action forces an improvement in your form while increasing the intensity of the squat.
  6. Push up: Drive your weight back up through your heels, keeping your feet flat on the ground. Your glutes and quads should be doing most of the work. Push up until you’re standing tall again to complete the rep, but avoid locking your knees at the top of the movement.

Consider the two following precautions before adding squats for the glutes to your workout routine. Firstly, athletes need to warm up before performing squats. Start by engaging in dynamic stretching and mobility exercises to warm up your muscles and joints. Secondly, squats for the glutes require the proper form to prevent injury. Make sure that you’re performing squats correctly so your glutes get the maximum benefits.

What are the best squat variations for developing gluteal muscles?

Below are nine of the best squat variations for strengthening and toning your gluteal muscles.

  • Bulgarian split squat: The Bulgarian split squat is a unilateral leg exercise where one leg is positioned forward on an elevated surface while the other leg is positioned behind. A Bulgarian split squat involves lowering the body into a squat position, which targets the quadriceps, glutes, and hamstrings.
  • Hack squat: The hack squat is a machine-based exercise targeting the glutes, hamstrings, and quadriceps where the individual places their shoulders and back against a pad and their feet on a platform. Then the individual performs a squatting motion by pushing against the platform.
  • Goblet squat: The goblet squat is a squat variation where an individual holds a weight, typically a dumbbell or kettlebell, in front of their chest while performing a squatting motion. This exercise targets the quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, and core muscles.
  • Leg press: The leg press is a machine-based exercise where the individual sits on a sled and pushes against a weighted platform using their legs, simulating a squatting motion. The leg press targets the quadriceps, hamstrings, and glutes.
  • Sumo squat: The sumo squat variation where the individual takes a wider stance with their toes pointing outwards. This exercise targets the inner thighs, glutes, quadriceps, and hamstrings.
  • Front squat: The front squat is a variation where the barbell is held across the front of the shoulders, with the elbows pointing forward. The front squat exercise places emphasis on the quadriceps, core muscles, and upper back.
  • Pistol squat: The pistol squat challenging unilateral squat variation where an individual performs a squat on one leg while the other leg is extended in front. This exercise targets the quadriceps, glutes, and hamstrings, and requires significant balance and stability.
  • Barbell back squat: The barbell back squat is a variation of traditional squat exercises where the barbell is placed across the upper back while performing a squatting motion. A barbell back squat exercise targets the quadriceps, hamstrings, and glutes, in addition to engaging the core and upper back for stability.
  • Assisted pistol squat: A modification of the pistol squat where the individual holds onto a support, such as a pole or TRX straps, for assistance and balance while performing the squat. It helps with developing strength and stability before progressing to unassisted pistol squats.

2. Dumbbell glute exercises

Dumbbell glute exercises are a collection of exercises that target and engage the gluteal muscles using dumbbells as a form of resistance. Glute exercises using dumbbells involve movements that activate the glutes, in addition to other muscle groups such as the quadriceps, hamstrings, and core. Dumbbell glute exercises add resistance to exercises and challenge the muscles further. Additionally, holding a dumbbell in each hand while performing a glute exercise increases the intensity and effectiveness of the exercise. Dumbbell glute exercises provide three main benefits. Firstly, dumbbell glute exercises help strengthen and develop the glutes, which promotes lower body power and stability. Secondly, dumbbell glute exercises contribute to sculpting and defining the lower body, which enhances the visual appearance of the glutes. Thirdly, dumbbell glute exercises improve posture and support a healthy lower back. Incorporating dumbbells into glute workouts adds variety and allows for progression as you can gradually increase the weight of the dumbbells.

How to do glute dumbbell exercises without risking injury

To do glute dumbbell exercises without risking injury, consider the following three tips. Firstly, start with the appropriate weight for your fitness level. Dumbbell glute exercises require you to work your way up to heavier weights to prevent injury. Secondly, you should make sure you perform dumbbell glute exercises with the proper form. You run the risk of an unbalanced workout if you don’t use the proper form. Thirdly, working out your glutes with dumbbells requires you to assess your personal fitness goals. Define your goals and listen to your body to prevent injury while performing dumbbell glute exercises.

What are the best dumbbell exercises for strengthening the glutes?

Below are six of the best dumbbell exercises for strengthening the glutes.

  • Romanian deadlift: The Romanian deadlift exercise where an individual holds a barbell or dumbbells in front of their thighs and hinges at the hips to lower the weight down while maintaining a slight bend in the knees. The movement primarily targets the hamstrings and glutes.
  • Single-leg deadlift: The single-leg deadlift is a unilateral exercise where an individual balances on one leg while hinging forward at the hips and extending the opposite leg straight behind. This exercise primarily targets the hamstrings, and glutes, and works on balance and stability.
  • Clamshell: The clamshell is a dumbbell glute exercise where an individual lies on their side with knees bent and ankles together. Then, from this position, they lift the top knee while keeping the feet together, engaging the gluteus medius muscle on the side of the hip.
  • Dumbbell hip thrust: The dumbbell hip thrust is an exercise where an individual sits on the ground with a weight resting on their hips. Then, the individual puts pressure on their heels to lift their hips off the ground, squeezing the glutes at the top of the movement.
  • Weighted step-ups: Weighted step-ups are an exercise that engages the glutes and quadriceps where an individual stands facing a step or platform and holds weights at their sides. Then, the individual steps onto the platform with one leg and pushes through the heel to lift their body up and repeats.
  • Dumbbell glute bridge: The dumbbell glute bridge is a glute exercise with the weight placed on the lower abdomen. The individual starts by lying on their back with knees bent and feet flat on the ground, then lifts their hips off the ground by squeezing the glutes.

3. Glute kickback

Glute kickback is a type of exercise that targets, strengthens, and tones the gluteal muscles. The glute kickback involves an athlete starting by positioning themselves on their hands and knees, with their palms and knees on the ground. Then, they extend one leg backward, kicking it upward while keeping it straight. The movement primarily focuses on activating the gluteus maximus in addition to engaging the hamstrings. Glute kickbacks offer the following three benefits. Firstly, glute kickbacks isolate and target the glute muscles, which helps to develop strength, power, and stability in the lower body. Secondly, glute kickbacks sculpt and enhance the shape of the glutes, which leads to a more defined and aesthetically pleasing appearance. Thirdly, glute kickback exercises assist in improving hip mobility and promoting better posture and gait. Glute kickbacks can be performed with body weight or with the addition of ankle weights or resistance bands for increased resistance and intensity.

How to do glute kickbacks safely

Learn how to do glute kickbacks safely and effectively by following the six steps below.

  1. Get into position: Position yourself on all fours, in a tabletop position on a mat. Ensure your hands are directly beneath your shoulders, and your knees are directly beneath your hips. Maintain a neutral spine.
  2. Prepare your foot: Flex one foot, positioning your heel towards the ceiling. This will be your working leg first.
  3. Begin the kickback: Lift your leg, keeping your knee bent and pushing your flexed foot towards the ceiling. Your thigh should align with your body and your foot should rise above your head as much as your flexibility allows.
  4. Squeeze at the top: Squeeze your glutes at the top of the movement for a second to maximize muscle activation.
  5. Lower down: Lower your leg back to the starting position, trying not to let your knee touch the ground until you’ve completed your set.
  6. Work one leg at a time: Repeat the exercise for the desired number of repetitions (for example, 10-15), then switch to the other leg.

Glute kickbacks are a safe exercise for beginners and advanced athletes alike. However, there are two main considerations to keep in mind before adding glute kickbacks to your workout. Firstly, glute kickbacks require you to properly warm up before you start your workout. Warming up before a glute workout prevents you from straining your muscles. Secondly, you should refrain from performing glute kickbacks if you are experiencing pain. The act of training to failure adds unnecessary strain and leads to muscle damage.

What are the best kickback variations for sculpting the gluteal muscles?

The following ten exercises are the best glute kickback variations for sculpting the gluteal muscles.

  • Donkey kicks: The donkey kick is an exercise that has an individual start on all fours and lift one leg back while keeping the knee bent at a 90-degree angle. Donkey kicks are a variation of glute kickbacks that target the glutes, particularly the gluteus maximus.
  • Cable glute kickback: The cable glute kickback is a variation of the glute kickback exercise that employs the cable machine. The individual attaches an ankle cuff to their ankle and performs a backward leg extension against the resistance of the cable, targeting the glutes.
  • Glute kickback machine exercises: Glute kickback machine exercises are performed using a specific machine that allows for targeted resistance against the glutes. The individual uses the machine to kick one leg backward, engaging the glutes and improving muscle strength and activation.
  • Banded glute kickback: The banded glute kickback is a glute kickback exercise that’s performed with a resistance band. The band is looped around the ankles or thighs, and the individual performs a backward leg extension against the resistance of the band, activating the glutes.
  • Standing glute kickback: The standing glute kickback is a glute kickback exercise performed while standing upright. The individual kicks one leg backward while maintaining balance and activating the glutes.
  • Reverse leg lift: A reverse leg lift is a glute kickback exercise where an individual lies on their stomach and lifts one leg off the ground while keeping it straight. This movement targets the glutes and lower back muscles.
  • Single-leg glute kickback: The single-leg glute kickback is a kickback that’s performed one leg at a time. The individual kicks one leg backward while keeping the knee bent, engaging the glutes and improving unilateral strength and balance.
  • Kneeling glute kickback: The kneeling glute kickback is a glute kickback exercise where an individual starts on their hands and knees and kicks one leg back while keeping the knee bent. The kneeling glute kickback movement targets the glutes and can be performed with or without added resistance.
  • Double-leg glute kickback: The double-leg glute kickback is a type of glute kickback performed with both legs simultaneously. The individual kicks both legs backward while maintaining balance and activating the glutes.
  • Hip thrust glute kickback: The hip thrust glute kickback is a combination exercise that involves performing a hip thrust motion and transitioning into a glute kickback at the top of the movement. This exercise targets the glutes and emphasizes both hip extension and glute activation.

4. Hip thrust

The hip thrust is an important glute exercise that activates and strengthens the gluteal muscles. The hip thrust primarily engages the gluteus maximus, with the secondary engagement of the hamstrings and core muscles to provide stability. Performing hip thrusts requires you to begin by sitting on the ground with your upper back supported against a bench or sturdy surface. Your feet are planted firmly on the floor, shoulder-width apart, and your knees are bent. From this position, you drive your hips upward by forcefully contracting your glutes, lifting your torso until your body forms a straight line from your knees to your shoulders.

Hip thrusts offer three main benefits. Firstly, hip thrusts isolate and target the glutes, leading to increased strength, power, and stability in the lower body. Secondly, hip thrusts promote glute development, helping to enhance the shape and definition of the buttocks for a more aesthetically pleasing appearance. Lastly, hip thrust exercises can contribute to improving hip mobility and supporting a better overall posture. Hip thrusts can be performed with body weight or with the addition of a barbell or resistance band for added intensity.

How to do hip thrusts safely

The eight steps below ensure proper form for doing hip thrusts safely.

  1. Locate a suitable surface: Begin by finding a bench or sturdy surface that is about knee height. This surface will provide support for your upper back during the exercise.
  2. Position your body: Sit on the ground with your back against the bench. The edge of the bench should be approximately at the level of your shoulder blades. Ensure your feet are planted firmly on the floor, shoulder-width apart.
  3. Align your knees: Bend your knees at a 90-degree angle. Your feet should be directly under your knees.
  4. Place your arms: Extend your arms out for balance. They can either rest on the bench, or you can hold onto the bench’s edge.
  5. Prepare for the movement: Focus on your form. Brace your core, tuck your chin to your chest, and keep your gaze forward.
  6. Perform the hip thrust: Contract your glutes forcefully to drive your hips upward. Lift your torso until your body forms a straight line from your knees to your shoulders. Be mindful not to hyperextend your back. The power should come from your hips and glutes, not your lower back.
  7. Hold the position: At the top of the movement, squeeze your glutes and hold for a second or two.
  8. Return to the starting position: Slowly lower your hips back down to the floor while maintaining control and tension in your glutes.

There are two main precautions to consider before incorporating hip thrusts into your core workout. Firstly, hip thrusts require the proper form to prevent injury at the knees, spine, or hips. Avoid using your lower back to lift your body, and keep your spine neutral throughout. Secondly, properly performing hip thrusts requires you to adequately prepare for your workout as outlined in the instructions above to prevent muscle damage.

What are the best hip thrust variations for working out the glutes?

Below are the eight best hip thrust variations for working out the glutes.

  • Barbell hip thrust: The barbell hip thrust is a hip thrust exercise where an individual sits on the ground with their upper back against a bench. Then, the individual places a barbell across their hips, and thrusts their hips upward, squeezing the glutes at the top of the movement.
  • B stance hip thrust: B stance hip thrust is a variation of the hip thrust exercise where the individual assumes a “B” stance by positioning one foot slightly in front of the other. This variation helps to activate the glutes more effectively and challenges stability.
  • Single leg hip thrust: The single-leg hip thrust is similar to the barbell hip thrust, but performed with only one leg. The individual keeps one foot off the ground while thrusting the hips upward, targeting one glute at a time and improving unilateral strength and stability.
  • Banded hip thrust: The banded hip thrust is a hip thrust variation that’s performed with a resistance band wrapped around the hips. The band adds external resistance, intensifying ‌glute activation throughout the movement.
  • Landmine hip thrust: The landmine hip thrust is an alternative variation where the barbell is anchored in a landmine apparatus or securely wedged into a corner. The individual performs the hip thrust motion with the barbell positioned diagonally, targeting the glutes and increasing the range of motion.
  • Mini band hip thrust: The mini band hip thrust exercise is performed with a mini resistance band positioned just above the knees. The band adds lateral resistance, engaging the gluteus medius and helping to strengthen the hip abductors.
  • Heel-elevated hip thrust: The heel-elevated hip thrust is a hip thrust variation where the individual elevates their heels by placing them on a platform or step. This modification increases the range of motion and emphasizes glute activation during ‌exercise.
  • Chaos hip thrust: The chaos hips thrust is a dynamic variation of the hip thrust exercise where the individual uses an unstable surface or equipment, such as a stability ball or foam roller, to increase the challenge to the glutes and core muscles.

5. Lunge

Lunge is a type of exercise that targets and strengthens the gluteal muscles. The basic movement of the lunge involves standing with your feet hip-width apart and then taking a big step forward with one leg, bending both knees to lower your body toward the ground. The front knee should be directly above the ankle, and the back knee should be lowered towards the floor without touching it.

The lunge movement primarily activates the gluteus maximus, engaging the quadriceps, hamstrings, and core muscles for stability as well. Lunges provide two main benefits for glute workouts. Firstly, lunges effectively increase flexibility and target the glutes, leading to lower body strength, power, and stability. Secondly, lunges help to shape and tone the glutes, contributing to a more defined and visually appealing appearance. Lunges are performed with body weight or they use dumbbells or barbells to add resistance and challenge.

How to safely do lunges when targeting the glutes

Follow the nine steps below to do lunges safely when targeting your glutes.

  1. Stand tall: Stand with your feet together and your shoulders relaxed. Engage your core muscles to maintain stability throughout the exercise.
  2. Take a step forward: Step forward with one leg, taking a comfortable stride length. Your front knee should be directly above your ankle, forming a 90° angle when you lower into the lunge.
  3. Lower your body: Bend both knees simultaneously to lower your body toward the ground. Aim to lower your back knee until it is a few inches above the floor, maintaining a straight line from your head to your back foot.
  4. Engage your glutes: As you lower into the lunge position, focus on pushing through the heel of your front foot to activate your glutes. Imagine squeezing your glutes to lift your body back up to the starting position.
  5. Keep your chest up: Keep your chest up and your back straight throughout the lunge. Avoid leaning too far forward or backward to maintain proper alignment.
  6. Drive back up: Press through the heel of your front foot to drive yourself back up to the starting position. Exhale as you rise, and remember to continue engaging your glutes throughout the movement.
  7. Alternate legs: Complete the desired number of repetitions on one leg before switching to the other. Focus on maintaining glute engagement in both legs throughout the entire set.
  8. Control your movement: Perform lunges in a controlled manner to emphasize the activation of your glute muscles. Avoid using momentum to push yourself back up, as this reduces the engagement of the targeted muscles.
  9. Breathe: Inhale as you lower into the lunge and exhale as you drive back up. Controlled breathing helps you maintain focus and stability during the exercise.

Include lunges in your workout routine and perform multiple sets and repetitions (for example, three sets of 12 repetitions per leg) to effectively challenge your glutes and promote muscle definition and strength. Lunges for glutes are safe if you perform them correctly and don’t overwork your muscles. There are two main precautions to take before starting lunges for the glutes. Firstly, make sure that you maintain the proper stance while performing lunges. Secondly, ensure that you only gradually increase the intensity or resistance if doing variations or alternatives to lunges.

What are the best lunge variations for activating the glute muscles?

The following are the nine best lunge variations for activating the glute muscles and improving your strength, stability, and tone.

  • Reverse lunge: The reverse lunge is a variation of lunges for glutes where an individual takes a step backward with one leg, lowering the body until the front knee is at a 90-degree angle. This movement primarily targets the quadriceps, hamstrings, and glutes.
  • Lateral lunge: The lateral lunge is a variation of lunges for the glutes where an individual takes a step to the side, lowering the body towards the bent leg while keeping the opposite leg straight. Lateral lunges primarily target the inner and outer thighs, glutes, and adductor muscles.
  • Curtsy lunge: The curtsy lunge is a variation where an individual crosses one leg behind the body, resembling a curtsy motion. This movement targets the glutes, inner thighs, and outer hips.
  • Walking lunges: Walking lunges are a dynamic glute exercise where an individual performs consecutive lunges by taking steps forward, and alternating legs. This exercise engages the quadriceps, hamstrings, and glutes, and improves balance and coordination.
  • Weighted lunges: Weighted lunges are a variation of lunges performed while holding weights, such as dumbbells or a barbell, to increase resistance and challenge the lower body muscles further. This variation can enhance strength and muscle development.
  • Alternating lunges: Alternating lunges are performed by alternating legs with each repetition. This exercise targets the quadriceps, hamstrings, and glutes, and improves overall lower body strength and stability.
  • Front lunges: The front lunge is a lunge variation where an individual takes a step forward with one leg, lowering the body until the front knee is at a 90-degree angle. This exercise targets the quadriceps, hamstrings, and glutes, and improves balance and coordination.
  • Sliding side lunges: Sliding side lunges are a lunge variation where an individual performs a lateral lunge while sliding one foot to the side on a smooth surface, such as a slider or towel. This exercise targets the inner and outer thighs and glutes and challenges stability and control.
  • Zigzag lunges: Zigzag lunges are a type of dynamic lunge exercise where an individual takes diagonal steps forward or backward, alternating legs in a zigzag pattern. This movement engages the quadriceps, hamstrings, and glutes, and improves agility and coordination.

6. Hip extension exercises

Hip extension exercises target and engage the gluteal muscles, hamstrings, and lower back. Hip extension exercises involve movements that extend the hip joint, such as hip thrusts, glute bridges, deadlifts, and kettlebell swings. The primary focus of hip extension exercises is to activate and strengthen the gluteus maximus, the largest muscle in the gluteal group, which is responsible for hip extension and contributes to overall lower body strength and power.

Incorporating hip extension exercises into your glute workout routing brings three primary benefits. Firstly, hip extension exercises help to develop and strengthen the gluteal muscles, leading to improved lower body strength, power, and stability. Secondly, hip extension exercises contribute to sculpting and enhancing the shape of the glutes, resulting in a more defined and aesthetically pleasing appearance. Thirdly, hip extension exercises assist in improving hip mobility and flexibility, which is beneficial for everyday movements and athletic performance.

How to do hip extension exercises safely

The following nine steps illustrate the proper form for doing hip extension exercises safely.

  1. Prepare your space: Clear a comfortable space on the floor. Laying down a yoga or exercise mat is helpful, but not strictly necessary for hip extensions.
  2. Position your body: Position yourself on all fours (hands and knees). Your hands should be directly under your shoulders, and your knees should be directly under your hips.
  3. Brace your core: Engage your core muscles to provide stability and prevent your back from arching or sagging.
  4. Prepare for the movement: Shift your weight slightly onto your left knee and hand for balance. Maintain a neutral spine and keep your gaze downward to ensure your neck remains aligned with your spine.
  5. Perform the hip extension: Lift your right leg, keeping your knee bent at a 90-degree angle until your thigh is parallel to the floor and the sole of your right foot is facing the ceiling. You should feel the contraction in your glutes and hamstring.
  6. Hold the position: Hold this position for a moment at the top, making sure to squeeze your glutes.
  7. Return to the starting position: Slowly lower your right knee back to the starting position, maintaining control throughout the movement.
  8. Switch sides: Repeat the same steps on the opposite side, shifting your weight onto your right knee and hand as you lift your left leg.
  9. Repeat: Continue to alternate sides for your desired number of repetitions. Remember to maintain a slow and controlled movement to maximize the exercise’s effectiveness.

Hip extension exercises risk causing lower back pain, knee strain, and muscle imbalances if you perform them incorrectly. Ensure that you’re protecting yourself from injury by taking the following two precautions into consideration before doing hip extensions. Firstly, properly performing hip extensions requires you to maintain proper technique and start off slow. Secondly, consider your personal limitations before starting hip extension exercises.

What are the best hip extension variations for targeting the glutes?

Below are the best six hip extension variations for targeting the glutes.

  • Fire hydrant exercise: The fire hydrant is a hip extension exercise where an individual starts on all fours and lifts one leg out to the side, resembling a dog urinating on a fire hydrant. The fire hydrant movement primarily targets the gluteus medius and gluteus maximus muscles.
  • Side leg raise: The side leg raise is a hip extension alternative exercise where an individual lies on their side and lifts the top leg upward while keeping it straight. Side leg raises primarily target the hip abductor muscles, including the gluteus medius and gluteus minimus.
  • Hip raise: The hip raise is a hip extension exercise alternative that involves lying on the back with knees bent and lifting the hips off the ground by pressing through the heels. The hip raise exercise primarily targets the gluteus maximus and hamstrings.
  • Prone hip extension: The prone hip extension is an exercise where an individual lies face down on a mat or bench and lifts one leg upward while keeping it straight. This movement primarily targets the gluteus maximus and lower back muscles.
  • Standing hip extension: The standing hip extension is an exercise where an individual stands upright and extends one leg straight back, squeezing the glutes at the top of the movement. This exercise targets the gluteus maximus and helps improve balance and stability.
  • Foldover: The foldover is a movement where an individual bends forward at the hips with a straight back, allowing the torso to come parallel to the ground. This position can be incorporated into various exercises, such as fold-over hamstring stretches or fold-over rows, to target different muscle groups and promote flexibility or strength.

7. Glute bridge

Glute bridge is a type of glute exercise that requires an athlete to lie flat on their back and raise their hips in the air to form a bridge. The glute bridge targets the gluteal muscles, hamstrings, and core muscles for stability. During the glute bridge, the athlete begins by lying on their back with their knees bent and their feet flat on the ground, hip-width apart. From this position, they drive through their heels, lifting their hips off the ground until their body forms a straight line from their knees to their shoulders. There are three main benefits of performing the glute bridge. Firstly, the glute bridge strengthens your glutes, which leads to lower body power. Secondly, the glute bridge helps to sculpt and tone the glutes, which prevents an unbalanced physique. Thirdly, the glute bridge exercise improves hip mobility and enhances overall lower body flexibility. Glute bridges are performed with body weight, while variations such as single-leg or weighted glute bridges may be incorporated to add challenge and progression.

How to do a glute bridge safely

The instructions below show you how to do a glute bridge safely as you activate your posterior chain.

  1. Lie down: Position yourself flat on your back. Your arms should be fully extended by your sides, palms facing down.
  2. Position your legs: Bend your knees and place your feet flat on the ground. They should be hip-width apart and positioned so that your fingertips can just graze your heels.
  3. Engage your core: Brace your abdominal muscles to stabilize your core. This will protect your lower back during the exercise.
  4. Begin the movement: Push through your heels and raise your hips off the ground by squeezing your glutes. Your body should form a straight line from your shoulders to your knees, with a neutral spine. Do not rely on your lower back to perform this movement.
  5. Hold the top position: At the top of the bridge, hold for a moment. Make sure to keep your glutes engaged and don’t let your hips drop.
  6. Lower down: Slowly lower your hips back down to the starting position while maintaining control in order to complete the rep. This should be done with the same level of control as when lifting your hips.

Glute bridge is a safe exercise to add to your workout regime if you’re trying to tone your glutes, but there are two main precautions to consider. Firstly, you shouldn’t perform a glute bridge without properly warming up. The glute bridge appears simple, but the unexpected added strain on your muscles can lead to damage that prevents you from continuing your workout. Secondly, the glute bridge requires you to gradually increase the intensity to prevent burnout. Adding weight and resistance is a good way to intensify your workout, but the additional weight should be added with caution.

What are the best glute bridge variations for improving gluteal muscle stability?

Below are nine examples of the best glute bridge variations for improving the stability of your gluteal muscles.

  • Single-leg glute bridge: The single-leg glute bridge is an exercise where an individual lies on their back with one knee bent and the other leg extended straight in the air. They then lift their hips off the ground by squeezing the glutes, focusing on one leg at a time for increased intensity and unilateral strength.
  • Barbell glute bridge: The barbell glute bridge is a variation of the glute bridge exercise where an individual places a barbell across their hips while lying on their back. They then lift their hips off the ground, engaging the glutes and hamstrings while using the added resistance of the barbell.
  • Glute bridge with bench: The glute bridge with a bench exercise is performed with the upper back and shoulders resting on a bench or elevated surface. This variation allows for an increased range of motion and deeper activation of the glutes.
  • Glute bridge with a mini band: The glute bridge with a mini band is a glute bridge exercise performed with a mini resistance band looped just above the knees. The band adds lateral resistance, activating the gluteus medius and improving hip stability.
  • Standard glute bridge: The standard glute bridge exercise where you lie on your back with your knees bent and feet flat on the ground. Lift your hips off the ground, squeezing the glutes at the top of the movement, and then lower back down.
  • Single-leg glute bridge with bench: This single-leg glute bridge is performed with the upper back and shoulders resting on a bench or elevated surface. This exercise challenges balance and targets one glute at a time.
  • Single-leg glute bridge with a mini band: This single-leg glute bridge exercise is performed with a small band just above the knees. This variation adds lateral resistance and intensifies the activation of the glutes on one leg.
  • Glute bridge with a mini band & frog pump: The glute bridge with a mini band & frog pump is a glute bridge variation where an individual places a mini resistance band just above the knees and performs a frog pump motion by opening and closing the knees while lifting the hips. This exercise targets the glutes and inner thighs.
  • Glute bridge with suspension straps: This glute bridge variation is performed with suspension straps, such as TRX or other similar equipment. The individual holds onto the straps and performs the glute bridge motion, engaging the glutes while adding instability and core engagement.

8. Glute ham raise

The glute ham raise is an exercise that targets the posterior chain of gluteal muscles, as well as the hamstrings and core. During a glute ham raise, the athlete starts by positioning themselves on a Glute Ham Raise (GHD) machine or kneeling pad, with their feet secured under the foot pads and their upper body inclined forward. From this position, they lower their upper body towards the ground while keeping the glutes and hamstrings engaged and then push back up to the starting position using the glute and hamstring muscles.

The glute ham raise has the following two main benefits. Firstly, glute ham raises effectively engage the core and hamstrings, leading to increased strength, power, and stability in the two muscle groups. Secondly, the glute ham raise exercise assists in improving lower back stability. Stabilizing the lower back promotes proper posture and reduces back pain.

How to do the glute ham raise safely

The seven steps below explain how to do the glute ham raise safely.

  1. Prepare the machine: Adjust the footplate of the GHD machine so that when you lie on the machine, your knees are just behind the pad, and your feet are securely hooked under the footplate.
  2. Position your body: Carefully mount the machine, placing your feet under the footplate and your knees just behind the pad. Your upper body should be in line with the lower body like you are about to perform a plank, but with your feet secured.
  3. Engage your core: Brace your core and maintain a straight line from your head to your knees. This starting position should look like a kneeling plank.
  4. Begin the movement: Start lowering your body forward as one unit. The movement should be controlled, with your core engaged and back straight.
  5. Continue lowering: Continue to lower your body, while keeping your core engaged, until you reach a horizontal position, or as far as you can go while maintaining good form.
  6. Start the ascent: Push your toes against the footplate, flex your hamstrings, and squeeze your glutes to reverse the movement.
  7. Complete the movement: Keep rising until you’ve returned to the starting position, maintaining the straight line from your head to your knees to complete the rep.

Glute ham raises are advanced compound exercises that increase the mobility of the hips, and knees, and work the glutes and hamstrings. Due to the complexity of the movement and the use of the GHD, consider the following two precautions before adding glute ham raises to your glute workout routine. First, glute ham raises add stress to your posterior chain. You should make sure you have the proper form and physical abilities necessary to perform a glute ham raise before adding the exercise to your glute routine. Second, glute ham raises are typically performed with a Glute Ham Developer. Consult training videos or a physical trainer if you’re unsure how to use a GHD machine.

What are the best ham raise variations for activating the glutes?

The following nine exercises are the best ham raise variations for activating the glutes.

  • Glute ham raise with bands: The glute ham raise with bands is a variation of the glute ham raise exercise where an individual secures resistance bands around the shoulders or chest and performs the movement. The bands add additional resistance, challenging the glutes, hamstrings, and lower back muscles.
  • Single-leg glute ham raise: The single-leg glute ham raise is a unilateral variation of the glute ham raise exercise where an individual performs the movement with one leg while keeping the other leg extended straight. This variation increases the demand on the glutes, hamstrings, and core for stability and strength.
  • Glute ham raise with weight: The weighted glute ham raise is performed while holding weights, such as a dumbbell or a plate, against the chest. This variation adds external resistance to the movement, increasing the challenge for the glutes and hamstrings.
  • Glute ham raise on a GHD machine: The glute ham raise on a GHD machine is an exercise performed using a Glute Ham Developer machine. The individual positions themselves on the machine, securing their feet and knees, and performs the movement by lowering the upper body while keeping the legs fixed, targeting the glutes, hamstrings, and lower back.
  • Glute ham raise on a Roman chair: The glute ham raise on a Roman chair is a variation of the glute ham raise exercise performed using a Roman chair or hyperextension bench. The individual positions themselves with their upper body supported and their feet secured, and then performs the movement by lowering the upper body while keeping the legs fixed, targeting the glutes, hamstrings, and lower back.
  • Glute ham raise with a pause at the bottom: The glute ham raise with a pause at the bottom is an exercise with a deliberate pause at the bottom of the movement. This pause increases the time under tension, intensifying the activation of the glutes and hamstrings.
  • Glute ham raise with a hold at the top: The glute ham raise with a hold at the top is an exercise with a brief hold at the top of the movement where the body is fully extended. This hold emphasizes the contraction of the glutes and hamstrings, maximizing muscle activation.
  • Glute ham raise with a slow eccentric phase: The glute ham raise with a slow eccentric phase emphasizes the eccentric, or lowering, phase of the glute ham raise exercise by controlling the descent. Slowing down the movement emphasizes the lengthening of the glutes and hamstrings, providing an additional challenge.
  • Glute ham raise with a fast concentric phase: The glute ham raise with a fast concentric phase emphasizes the concentric, or lifting, phase of the glute ham raise exercise by performing it with explosive speed and power. This variation focuses on the acceleration and contraction of the glutes and hamstrings, developing strength and power in the muscles.

What are the best butt workouts at home?

The best butt workouts at home are workouts you can do with minimal equipment such as lunges, kettlebell swings, and deadlifts. Not everyone has an at-home gym stocked with various weights and all the machines you could ever need. The lack of heavy equipment shouldn’t stand in the way of exercising your glutes. There are many variations and alternatives to glute exercises that use accessories you can easily incorporate into your workout routine at home, such as dumbbells, resistance bands, and kettlebells.

Below are the eight best butt workouts at home.

  • Donkey kicks: Donkey kicks are an alternative glute exercise for a home butt workout. Start on all fours with your leg bent, and raise your left leg up so your knee is parallel to your hips and your foot is at a 90-degree angle to your knee. Lower your leg back down and repeat.
  • Single-leg deadlift: A single-leg deadlift is a butt workout you can perform at home. Start by standing with your ‌feet shoulder-width apart. Then, bend at your hips and lower your hands to the floor while lifting your left leg behind you. Stop when your chest is parallel to the floor, hold for one second, and then return to the upright position. You can add dumbbells to each hand to intensify the deadlift.
  • Fire hydrant exercise: Fire hydrant glute exercises are convenient for a beginner home workout. Start on all fours, and lift your right leg up to the side without moving your torso. Then lower your leg back down and repeat.
  • Side lunge: The side lunge involves starting with your feet together and taking a big step out to the right with your right leg. Bend your right knee and lower your bum toward the ground and make sure your knee doesn’t extend past your toes. Return to the starting point by pushing up through your right heel, and repeat on the opposite side.
  • Walking lunge: Walking lunges are a glute workout that’s able to be done at home. Start with your right foot forward so your right knee is over your right ankle at a 90-degree angle. Squeeze your glutes and push up from your left foot, lifting your knee up. Put your left foot on the ground and repeat the process on the opposite side.
  • Single-leg bridge: A single-leg bridge is a home workout that involves laying on your back with your knees bent. Then, extend your right leg, and push up through your left heel, keeping your hips level. Finish all reps on your right leg before switching to your left. Traditional bridges are an alternative if single-leg bridges are too difficult for the time being.
  • Banded butterfly bridge: The banded butterfly bridge is a glute exercise alternative for an at-home workout that uses a resistance band. Put a resistance band just above your knees. With your upper back on the floor and your knees bent. Lift your bum up, and bring your knees out until you feel the burn in your glutes. Bring your knees back together, and lower your bum to the floor.
  • Alternating kettlebell swings: Alternating kettlebell swings require you to stand with your feet wider than a shoulder-width apart while holding a kettlebell in your right hand with your palm facing your body. Bend your knees slightly, push your bum backward, and swing the kettlebell between your legs. Bring your hips forward and come up to a standing position. Swing the kettlebell up to shoulder level, and grab hold of it with your left hand, repeating the process, switching hands each time.

Home butt workouts are convenient for athletes who don’t have the time, money, or confidence to work out in a gym. However, working out at home requires extra precautions because you don’t have professional trainers to instruct you. For example, heavy deadlifts are possible at home but should still be performed with a spotter and safety in mind. Additionally, it is important that you don’t overdo it by incorporating too much weight and risk injury.

What are the best glute exercises with no equipment?

Below are the five best glute exercises at home with no equipment.

  • Reverse lunge: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and step backward with your left foot, keeping your heel off the ground. Bend both knees to 90 degrees and lower your body into a lunge. Push off from the ball of your left foot and return to the standing position. Repeat with the other leg.
  • Sumo squatsStand with your feet more than a hip-width apart, and your toes pointed slightly outward. Push your bum back and bend your knees into a low squat. Drive back up through your heels until you’re standing upright.
  • Clamshell: Lie on your left side with your knees bent at 90 degrees. Raise your right thigh toward the ceiling, squeezing your glutes. Slowly lower your left back down and finish all reps before turning over to your right side.
  • Marching glute bridge: An adaptation to the glute bridge is the marching glute bridge that will really set your glutes on fire. Lie on the floor with your knees bent and your feet ‌hip-width apart. Lift your hips up to create a straight line from your knees to your shoulders, and hold the position. Bring your right foot off the floor, raising your knee up to your chest but stopping to create a 90-degree angle. Lower your leg back to the floor and repeat with your left leg.
  • Sidestep wide squat: Start off by standing with your feet together and your hands held at chest height. Step out wide to the right with your right foot, squatting down by bending both knees. Then push off from your right foot and return to your upright position. Complete all reps on your right side before switching to your left leg.

Glute exercises without equipment rely on body weight to add resistance to a workout. For example, squats and lunges both target the gluteal muscles and can be performed without additional equipment or accessories. The simple motion and weight of your body are enough for a squat or lunge to engage your glutes and peripheral muscles. Working out your glutes at home with no equipment may require an increase in workout duration or frequency to make up for the lack of resistance from weights or cable machines. However, consistency and progressive endurance will lead you to desirable results, even without equipment.

What are the best glute workouts for women?

The best glute workouts for women are exercises that target the gluteal muscles in women and emphasize the physical features that women desire. Glute workouts are highly beneficial for women as not only do they tone your lower body, but they help alleviate back pain, protect your joints, and improve your posture. Women can benefit from many glute exercises, but the best glute workouts for women require women to consider personal goals and fitness levels before embarking on a new workout routine.

Below are five of the best glute workouts for women.

  • Glute bridge: Glute bridges are good for women because they support lower back health, enhance athletic performance, and help shape glutes. Perform a glute bridge by laying on your back with your feet ‌hip-width apart and your knees bent. With your weight in your heels, push your lower back and hips up. Once you fully extend your hips, squeeze your glutes and hold for one second. Slowly lower your hips back down to your starting position, and repeat.
  • Dumbbell deadlift: A dumbbell deadlift workout for women is beneficial because it targets multiple muscles, promotes flexibility, and improves posture. Start by positioning your feet hip-width apart, holding a dumbbell in each hand, and bending your knees slightly. Push your bum back and lower the dumbbells along your shins until your torso is almost parallel to the floor. Push through your heels to return to your starting position while keeping the dumbbells as close to your body as possible.
  • Hip thrust: Hip thrusts are beneficial glute exercises for women because they promote stability, build strength, and enhance your glutes. Start a traditional hip thrust by laying your upper back and shoulders on an elevated surface, bending your knees, and keeping your feet flat on the floor. Tuck your chin in, push through your heels, and bring your hips up. You should create a straight line from your knees to your shoulder blades. Squeeze your glutes at the top and return to step one to repeat the exercise.
  • Reverse lunge: The reverse lunge is a glute workout for women because they are a lower-impact exercise, promotes functional movement within the hips, and tones the glutes. Start with your feet shoulder-width apart and step your right foot back behind you. Keep your chest up and bend both knees until your left thigh is parallel to the floor. Push through your left heel to return to a standing position.
  • Sumo squat: Sumo squats are one of the best glute workouts for women because they target the inner thighs, core, hips, and glutes. Start by standing with your feet over a hip-width apart and point your toes slightly outward. Bend your knees into a low squat and push your bum back. Drive back up through your heels until you’re standing upright.

Anyone can perform glute exercises to help build strength in their lower body. However, women who are new to working out should take their glute workouts easy in the beginning and pay more attention to form than reps or adding on additional weights. Once they’ve mastered their form and built up strength, women can then include dumbbells or barbells into their routine.

What are the best glute workouts for men?

The best glute workouts for men are exercises that target the gluteal muscles and promote physical traits that are popular among men. Glute workouts for men can be the same as glute workouts for women, but the results that men and women wish to achieve can be different. Glute workouts are beneficial for men because they stimulate the lower body, enhance physical performance, and lead to a well-balanced and defined physique. Men may choose to incorporate additional weight, resistance, and intensity into their workouts, but men still need to consider their physical limitations and not overwork their muscles.

Below are the five best glute workouts for men.

  • Goblet squat: Goblet squats are one of the best glute workouts for men because they target multiple muscle groups and improve mobility. Start by standing with your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. Hold a dumbbell at your chest with both hands and keep your elbows tucked in, push your bum back, and lower yourself into a squat position. Return to standing upright by pushing into your heels.
  • Glute bridge: Glute bridges are beneficial workouts for men because they promote posterior chain activation and improve hip mobility. Start by laying on your back with your knees bent and your feet ‌hip-width apart. Channel your weight in your heels, and push your lower back and hips upwards. When your hips are fully extended, squeeze your glutes and hold for one second. Slowly lower your hips back down to your starting position, and repeat.
  • Donkey kicks: Donkey kicks are a beneficial glute workout for men due to the way they isolate and engage the glutes, and improve stability. Start on all fours with your leg bent and raise your left leg up so your knee is parallel to your hips. Your foot should be at a 90-degree angle to your knee. Lower your leg back down and repeat.
  • Single-leg deadlift: The single-leg deadlift is one of the best glute workouts for men because it improves hip function, engages peripheral muscles, and helps prevent injury. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and a dumbbell in your right hand. Bend at your hips and lower the dumbbell to the floor while lifting your left leg behind you. Pause when your chest is parallel to the floor, and then return to the upright position.
  • Cable machine glute kickback: Cable machine glute kickbacks benefit men by adding versatility to training and providing tension to a workout. Set the cable machine to its lowest setting and clip an ankle strap to the cable. Wrap the ankle strap around your right ankle. Take one step back from the machine, keep your back flat, and lean forward. Slowly kick your right leg back with a soft bend in your left knee until it is parallel to the floor. Squeeze your glutes, and lower your leg back down.

The best glute workouts for men lead to strong glutes with tone and definition. Men should remember to use proper form while working out their glutes to prevent injury.

Should guys train glutes?

Yes, guys should absolutely train glutes. Glute workouts for men are beneficial for the following three health and wellness benefits that come with training glutes. Firstly, guys should train their glutes to stabilize their pelvis and lower body. Stabilizing your lower body will improve posture and gait. Secondly, men should train their glutes to protect their knees, hips, and back from injury. Glute exercises improve hip extension, abduction, and hip rotation, which contribute to more control over physical motion, reducing the risk of ‌injury. Thirdly, guys should train their glutes to tone their buttocks. Neglecting a singular area of your body while working out will result in an unsymmetrical body shape. Training glutes keep men from having an overly bulky upper body with a weak lower body.

How often should you train your glutes for growth?

You should train your glutes two to three times a week if you’re looking to develop the gluteal muscles. Training your glutes three times a week is optimal for growth as your glutes have time to recover on the rest days you take in between training. A glute training routine will vary depending on the athlete’s fitness level. For example, a beginner may want to start out once or twice a week to prevent a tear or strain. However, a more skilled athlete can handle a more intensive workout routine. Additionally, the type of glute training you take on will determine how many times a week you should train. For example, if you’re lifting heavy weights, as opposed to small weights or body weight, you’ll need more time for the microscopic tears in your glutes to recover. Overworking your glutes, lifting too heavy weights, or working out on consecutive days can hinder your glute growth entirely. All muscles need time to repair themselves, and by not allowing a rest period, you can ultimately injure yourself. Remember that overworking your muscles leads to glute injuries that put you at risk of missing more days in the gym.

What are the best glute workouts for mass?

The best glute workouts for mass are movements that target the gluteal muscles to increase size and strength. Glute workouts that incorporate additional weight and resistance are the best options for increasing mass. Below are five of the best glute workouts for mass.

  • Bulgarian split squat: A Bulgarian split squat is a unilateral lower-body exercise that targets the glutes, quadriceps, and hamstrings. To perform a Bulgarian split squat, you stand a few feet in front of a bench or step, place one foot behind you on the elevated surface, and lower your body into a lunge position by bending your front knee. Then, push through the heel of your front foot to return to the starting position.
  • Sumo squat: A sumo squat is a variation of the traditional squat that emphasizes the inner thighs (adductors) and glutes. In a sumo squat, you position your feet wider than shoulder-width apart with your toes pointing out at an angle. From there, you lower your body by bending at the knees and hips, keeping your chest upright, and then pushing through your heels to stand back up.
  • Barbell back squat: The barbell back squat is a compound exercise that targets the glutes, quadriceps, and hamstrings. It involves placing a barbell across your upper back, standing with your feet shoulder-width apart, and then bending at the knees and hips to lower your body down into a squat position. Push through your heels to return to a standing position.
  • Barbell hip thrust: The barbell hip thrust is a glute-focused exercise that involves placing a barbell across your hips while sitting on the ground. Start with your upper back resting against a bench. You bend your knees, drive through your heels, and thrust your hips upward until your body forms a straight line from your shoulders to your knees. Then, lower your hips back down and repeat.
  • Single-leg glute bridge: The single-leg glute bridge is a unilateral exercise that primarily targets the glutes. Start by lying on your back with one foot flat on the ground and the other leg extended straight in the air. Pushing through the heel of the foot on the ground, you lift your hips off the ground, creating a bridge position, and then lower them back down. Repeat on the opposite leg.

Can I train my glutes every day?

No, you can’t train your glutes every day. Your glutes need time to recover in between training sessions. Overworking your glutes will lead to tight, sore muscles as well as possible injury, which is why it’s crucial to take a break between training your glutes. Beginners need to consider their limitations before training their glutes and aspire to train 2-3 times per week. More advanced athletes can increase their training regimen to 4-5 days per week. However, athletes need to ensure that they’re getting adequate rest between glute days because muscles need time to repair stretch and strain. Always consult with a professional before embarking on a new workout regimen because they will direct you on how to develop a proper glute training schedule.

Is it okay to only train glutes?

No, it isn’t okay to only train glutes. Only training glutes leads to an unbalanced physique and issues with posture and gait. Glute exercises should be part of a comprehensive workout to prevent muscle strain and injury. Targeting the glutes is beneficial for lower body strength, athletic endurance, and physical appearance. However, incorporating other workouts into your routine ensures you engage all major muscle groups, which gives you a balanced muscle definition. Comprehensive workouts that include glute exercises promote symmetry and help you develop the functional strength necessary to take your workouts to the next level.

8 Best Glute Workouts: Exercises, Training, Safety, and Variations | The Workout Digest (2024)

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